The Callithumpian Blog

Posts Tagged ‘callithumpian consort’

OPEN FOR’m: Chaya Czernowin

In Uncategorized on October 28, 2013 at 9:23 am
“What I try to do is to create a strong experience which is almost kinesthetic… through your ears, you can actually smell, you can see, you can really come into touch with something that is not a melody or a harmony or a counterpoint. More than that, it is almost like a living organism… not an organism that we already know — it’s not something that you already have a drawer for. It is something that is a holistic entity, it has its own kind of way of existing in the universe. It is completely new.”
— Chaya Czernowin, composer

 
OPEN FOR’m: Chaya Czernowin
Tuesday, Oct 29th, 2013
7:00 PM in Brown Hall at New England Conservatory
FREE ADMISSION
 
OPEN FOR’m is an immersion, an encounter, a multi-dimensional experience. The Callithumpian Consort focuses on a single piece of music in a free-form event made of equal parts teach-in, demonstration, discussion, open rehearsal, Q and A session, pre-concert lecture, and post-concert reception. Sit next to and among the performers; experience the music, its history, challenges and beauties from inside the group!
 
Tonight’s concert is an encounter with the music of Chaya Czernowin (Walter Bigelow Rosen Professor of Music, Harvard University), that will continue at Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum on Thursday (10/31) with the premiere of Czernowin’s new work, Slow Summer Stay III: Upstream. The piece was commissioned by the Callithumpian Consort and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, with generous assistance from the Ernst von Siemens Music Foundation.
 
We would love to see you on Tuesday, October 29th at our OPEN FOR’m in Brown Hall at the New England Conservatory — and please join us on Thursday, October 31st at the Gardner Museum for the premiere.  Click here to read a glowing preview article in the Boston Globe.
For $5 student tickets at the Gardner, please call the Box Office at 617.278.5156 (Wed-Mon, 10a-4p).

Above photo of Chaya Czernowin: Astrid Ackermann/Schott Promotion

Announcing 2013-2014!

In concerts, upcoming on September 11, 2013 at 2:13 pm

Image

We’re excited to announce our current season — lots of incredible music by Onur Yildirim, Alvin Lucier, Lei Liang, Tristan Murail, Helmut Lachenmann, Morton Feldman, and John Zorn for our 2013-2014 performance season. We’ll be giving world premieres of new works written by Chaya Czernowin and Lee Hyla, featuring both Czernowin and Hyla in our OPEN FOR’M platform in conjunction with the Gardner Museum in Calderwood Hall — not to mention we’ll also be playing in a new series at the Gardner, “In and Out”: daytime concerts in which Callithumpian will perform Karlheinz Stockhausen‘s Aus den sieben Tagen. We’re also stoked to be playing a new piece by Roger Miller later in the spring.

What else? We’re off to Mexico in November, and we’re performing all around Boston and in NYC with a unique, all-Lucier show at Roulette.

Why don’t you check out our 2013-2014 calendar? More information will be coming your way — sign up for our newsletter to get the latest!

SICPP 2013!

In concerts, SICPP on June 14, 2013 at 12:16 pm

2013sicppmailchimp

SICPP 2013 HAS ARRIVED!  We are thrilled to welcome BnG Composer-in-Residence Rand Steiger this summer at SICPP, as well as guest artist Winston Choi. Our evening concerts pack a punch this year — performances by Steve DruryYukiko TakagiWinston ChoiScott DealStuart Gerber,Corey HammAdrienne ArdittiJessie LaFargue, and yours truly, the Callithumpian Consort, Sunday eve through Friday eve. We end the week as usual: with the legendary SICPP Iditarod on Saturday, June 22, which runs from 4pm until whenever (last year it ended around 3am; this year may look to be a little more sane!).

In addition to the evening concerts, SICPP participants will perform solo repertoire in midday concerts at 11:30am on MondayWednesdayThursday, and Friday at Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (280 The Fenway). Museum admission fee is waived if you tell them at the door that you are attending the SICPP concert in Calderwood Hall. The Gardner is closed on Tuesdays, so Tuesday’s midday concert will be in Williams Hall, and will feature the percussionists of SICPP.

All concerts are free, except for Thursday’s SICPP/GuitarFest at the Fenway Center.


Sunday, June 16 @ 8pm, Jordan Hall
Stephen Drury, piano; Elizabeth Keusch, soprano; Jessi Rosinski, flute
Charles Ives: Concord Sonata
Helmut Lachenmann: Got Lost

Monday, June 17 @ 8pm, Jordan Hall
Winston Choi, piano
Elliott Carter: Two Diversions
Hans Thomalla: Piano Counterpart
Jacques Lenot: Cités de la nuit; Ils traversent la nuit
Brian Ferneyhough: Lemma–Icon–Epigram
Conlon Nancarrow: Two Canons for Ursula

Tuesday, June 18 @ 8pm, Jordan Hall
Yukiko Takagi, piano, electronics, video; Stephen Drury, piano;
Scott Deal, Stuart Gerber, percussion; & members of the Callithumpian Consort

Johannes Kreidler: Klavierstück 5 für Klavier und 4-kanalige ZuspielungStudie für Klavier, Audio- und Videozuspielung
John Zorn: Camarón for piano and four percussion (from Aporias)
Franco Donatoni: Hot
Béla Bartók: Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion

Wednesday, June 19 @ 8pm, Jordan Hall
Corey Hamm, piano; & members of the Callithumpian Consort
Rand Steiger (composer-in-residence): RésonateurA Menacing Plume
Tristan Murail: La Barque Mystique
Dorothy Chang: Ephemera; Echoes; Toccatina (from Five)
György Ligeti: L’Arrache-Coeur
David Rakowski: Étude No. 8: Close Enough for Jazz
Noël Lee: Étude No. 5 in A Minor, Op. 70: Legatospielen
Dai Fujikura: Étude No. 1: Frozen Heat
Earle Brown: Available Forms I

Thursday, June 20 @ 5pm, Fenway Center
$10 gen. admission / FREE students, seniors, NEC & NEU alumni
SICPP/Boston GuitarFest: Redcoat Reversal, New Music 
Clarence Barlow: …Until…
Rand Steiger: A Good Diffused
Rebecca Saunders: Vermillion
Jonathan Harvey: Still
More information here.

Thursday, June 20 @ 8pm, Jordan Hall
Yukiko Takagi, Stephen Drury, Corey Hamm, piano;
Scott Deal, Stuart Gerber, percussion; Keith Hamel, Caroline Park, electronics;
Adrienne Arditti, soprano; Jessie LaFargue, dancer; Callithumpian Consort

Rand Steiger (composer-in-residence): A Good DiffusedWoven Serenade
Elainie Lillios: The Rush of the Brook Stills the Mind
Keith Hamel: Touch
Kaija Saariaho: Six Japanese Gardens
Caroline Park: Music For Phrases

Friday, June 21 @ 4pm, Pierce Hall
Electronic Workshop Concert
Fresh new works for fixed and live/interactive electronics
by the participants in SICPP’s 2013 Electronic Workshop.

Friday, June 21 @ 8pm, Brown Hall
Stuart Gerber, percussion; & members of the Callithumpian Consort
Mathias Spahlinger: música impura
Alan Sentman: Patchwork
Iannis Xenakis: RebondsOkho
Adam Roberts: Anakhtara
Ulrich Kreppein: Abendlich auf schattenbegleiteten wegen

Saturday, June 22 @ 4pm, Brown Hall
THE SICPP IDITAROD: music starts at 4pm, come and go as you please!
a 6-hr-plus marathon concert featuring performances by the Fellows of the Institute, including music by Morton Feldman, Earle Brown, Luciano Berio, Frederic Rzewski, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Rand Steiger, George Crumb, Scott Deal, Charles Ives, Roger Miller, Mathias Spahlinger, Steve Reich, and the composers of the SICPP New Works program.

Feb. 20, OPEN FOR’m: Lei Liang

In concerts on February 15, 2013 at 1:37 pm

of_lei_web_sm
Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

7:00 P.M. in Brown Hall @ NEC
(NOTE: EARLY START TIME!)

OPEN FOR’m is an immersion, an encounter, a multi-dimensional experience.  The Callithumpian Consort focuses on a single piece of music in a free-form event made of equal parts teach-in, demonstration, free-form discussion, open rehearsal, Q and A session, pre-concert lecture, and post-concert reception.  Sit next to and among the performers; experience the music, its history, challenges and beauties from the inside of the group!

Tonight’s concert is an encounter with the music of NEC alumnus Lei Liang ’96, ’98 M.M.  This evening will include experiences with the following pieces:

Brush Stroke (2004)
Aural Hypothesis (2010)
Bamboo Lights (2013)
Parts for a Floating Space (2001)

OPEN FOR’m will continue with a concert at Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum on February 21st — the very next night — that will include the premiere of Bamboo Lights by Lei Liang, one of several Callithumpian Consort premieres scheduled for the Gardner Museum in 2013.

Cage, Brown, Poliks, Caballero, Lucier

In concerts on January 22, 2013 at 12:41 am

Image

Brown, Caballero, Cage, Lucier, Poliks
Saturday, January 26, 2013
Jordan Hall at the New England Conservatory
8 PM | Free

Earle Brown: String Quartet
Eduardo Caballero: What is time, please? Convergencias III for piano and live electronics
Marek Poliks: tress/burl (2012 SICPP commission)
Alvin Lucier: Braid (written for the Callithumpian Consort)
John Cage: String Quartet in Four Parts

Fresh from the Earle Brown Symposium, we’re thrilled to give another performance of Earle Brown‘s simultaneously “graphic” and “mobile” String Quartet (1965). As the String Quartet explores flexibility within sub-structures (Brown is known for pioneering open form), no two performances are intended to be identical.

Following the Brown is Mexican composer Eduardo Caballero‘s What is time, please? Convergencias III for piano and live electronics. Callithumpian’s Yukiko Takagi will be the soloist.

Marek Poliks‘s unrelenting tress/burl was first performed at the 2012 Summer Institute for Contemporary Performance Practice (SICPP) as the featured SICPP Composition Fellow commission. At its premiere, tress/burl was described by the Boston Globe’s Matthew Guerrieri as the “harsh, entertainingly maddening insistence of a conspiracy theorist.”

Last spring, we were fortunate to have Alvin Lucier in residence here at NEC; we premiered his beautiful septet, Braid (2012), written for us, later that year at SICPP. Bearing in mind Lucier’s emphasis on the propagation and flow of sound itself, Braid promises to be beyond exquisite in a space like Jordan Hall.

We close the program with a performance of John Cage‘s String Quartet in Four Parts (1950); for now, we’ll leave you with this:

“After reading the work of Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, I decided to attempt the expression in music of the ‘permanent emotions’ of Indian traditions: the heroic, the erotic, the wondrous, the mirthful, sorrow, fear, anger, the odious and their common tendency toward tranquility.” —John Cage

Join us this Saturday, January 26
at 8:00 PM in Jordan Hall.

We’d love to see you there.

Image

Earle Brown: Beyond Notation

In concerts on January 17, 2013 at 5:07 pm

Image

This Friday and Saturday, January 18 and 19th, Boston celebrates the American avant-garde composer Earle Brown (1926-2002) in the symposium Beyond Notation, hosted by Northeastern University. A native of Massachusetts, Brown studied at Northeastern and Schillinger House (now Berklee College of Music) before establishing his career in New York and Europe as a groundbreaking composer and conductor of graphic notation and “open form” music.

Stephen Drury and the Callithumpian Consort are among the international group of presenters, hailing from music, art, and dance disciplines, who will come together in examining the life and musical legacy of Earle Brown. Presenters include Kyle Gann (Bard College), Richard Toop (Sydney Conservatorium), Susan Sollins Brown (President, Earle Brown Music Foundation), Thomas Fichter (Director, Earle Brown Music Foundation), Carolyn Brown (Merce Cunningham Dance Company), Louis Pine, pianist Steffen Schleiermacher (Leipzig, Germany), and Mickey Katz (Boston Symphony Orchestra Chamber Players).

Callithumpian Consort will be performing in two evening concerts, sharing the bill both nights with pianist Steffen Schleiermacher. On January 18th, the program includes Earle Brown’s Times Five, Folio, Octet I, and String Quartet, alongside Karlheinz Stockhausen’s Klavierstueck XI (Schleiermacher), Lee Weisert’s New England Drift, and Christian Wolff’s Microexercises.  January 19th‘s program will feature Earle Brown’s Available Forms I, Sign Sounds, Centering, and Corroboree (3 pianos), as well as John Zorn’s For Your Eyes Only and Pierre Boulez’s Constellation-Miroir (Schleiermacher). Both evening concerts will be at 8:00 PM at the Fenway Center.

The U.S. premiere of Brown’s sound installation, Music for Galerie Stadler (1964) will be hosted by Gallery 360 at Northeastern University alongside a photo exhibit, January 14 – February 26. Events will be held at the Fenway Center of Northeastern University, Blackman Auditorium, and Calderwood Hall at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

Click here to register for any of the events/performances of Beyond Notation. All events are free and open to the public, but registration is recommended, as seating may be limited. The Art and Music of Earle Brown session on January 18 at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum will be subject to museum admission fees for registrations submitted after January 17.

See the full schedule and register at www.music.neu.edu/earlebrown.

Cage’s 100th at Gardner

In concerts on November 1, 2012 at 11:08 pm

7:00 PM | Thursday, November 1st, 2012
Celebrating John Cage’s 100th, Part II
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Join us at 7:00 PM, Thursday, November 1st at the Gardner Museum as we continue to celebrate John Cage’s 100th birthday year.

CagePostcard from Heaven
CageCheap Imitation
FeldmanTwo Pieces for Clarinet and String Quartet
Nono“Hay que caminar” soñando

For details and ticketing info, please visit the Gardner Museum.

OPEN FOR’M: CHEAP IMITATION

In concerts on October 24, 2012 at 9:43 am

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 8pm
BROWN HALL at NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY
O P E N   F O R ‘ M :   J O H N   C A G E   C H E A P   I M I T A T I O N

OPEN FOR’M is an immersion, an encounter, a multi-dimensional experience. On Tuesday, October 30, the Callithumpian Consort focuses on a single piece of music — John Cage’s Cheap Imitation — in a free-form event made of equal parts teach-in, demonstration, free-form discussion, open rehearsal, Q & A, pre-concert lecture, and post-concert reception.

The evening will include an open rehearsal of the piece, as well as excerpts from related works (Satie’s Socrate), related video footage, commentary from special guest LAURA KUHN from the John Cage Trust, discussions with the players themselves, and refreshments.

Consider yourself invited to eavesdrop on the ongoing conversation between the music and the musicians (and vice versa). Sit next to and among the performers; experience the music, its history, challenges, and beauties from inside of the group!

Join us in exploring John Cage’s Cheap Imitation.

The encounter with John Cage’s Cheap Imitation for orchestra continues with the performance of the complete work (alongside music of Luigi Nono and Morton Feldman) at the Gardner Museum on November 1st, 2012 as part of Callithumpian Consort’s year-long celebration of the John Cage Centennial.

CC at Boston College

In concerts on October 20, 2012 at 10:59 pm

We’re in residence this season at Boston College, working and performing with BC students in shared concerts as well as concerts of our own.

Coming up on Monday, October 22, Callithumpian performs music by CageFeldmanWolffBrown, and MurailThe concert begins at 8:00 PM in Gasson 100Admission is free.

Program details:

John CageString Quartet in Four Parts, Music for Seven
Morton FeldmanTwo Pieces for Clarinet and String Quartet
Tristan MurailLachrymae (commissioned by Callithumpian)
Earle BrownString Quartet
Christian WolffHay Una Mujer Desaparecida

For more information, please visit the Boston College Music DepartmentFor directions to the campus, please click here.

This concert is sponsored by the Institute for the Liberal Arts and the Music Department.

1-2-3: Solos, Duo, Trio

In concerts, upcoming on September 21, 2012 at 7:46 pm
Image

John Harbison (photo by Katrin Talbot)

Callithumpian Consort is back! — and ready to kick off the new season. We’re in Jordan Hall on Thursday, October 4th with an intimate program, focusing more inside the ensemble to reveal our individual, virtuostic soloists. The opening concert features two premieres (a Harbison world premiere, and a Roberts US premiere) performed by cellist Benjamin Schwartz.  All in all, the night contains a wide-ranging array of detailed sounds and ideas, coming from around the world and stretching deep into the mind and imagination.

Karina Fox begins the evening with Tristan Murail’s C’est un jardin secret, ma soeur, ma fiancee, une source scellee, une fontaine close… . The subtle work, written for viola (and as a wedding present for two of Murail’s friends), is described by Julian Anderson as “an exquisite miniature” containing the particular timbres and senses we come to identify as coming from Murail’s soundworld. Next, Trevor Bača gives us this pristine image for his Sekka (for unaccompanied flute): “Shining white sounds. A shifting multiplicity. And an intense and sculpted whisper.” The title essentially is a fusion and play on the Japanese characters for “snow” and, in part, “flower”, opening to a beautifully minimal analogy perfectly suited for the design and structure of the instrument. Flutist Jessi Rosinski performs.

Clarinetist Rane Moore and pianist Elaine Rombola team up to explore the sonic contours and extremes in the terrain of Jonathan Harvey’s Be(com)ing, and cellist Benjamin Schwartz presents two premieres this evening: Invention on a Theme by Wm. Shakespeare by John Harbison (a world premiere) and Anakhtara by Adam Roberts (US premiere). Both are commissioned works; the Harbison was commissioned for Schwartz’s 40th birthday (a treat from family and friends), and the Roberts piece was commissioned by the cellist himself.

Gabriela Diaz performs Roger Reynolds’s Kokoro for solo violin, a 27-minute work in 12 parts, exploring the idea of “kokoro” in its various meanings: the actual, physical heart, the emotional “true” heart, the mind, soul, and spirit (Daisetsu Suzuki). According to a program note, Reynolds found this multi-tiered concept to be “irresistable”, and in a performance note, imagines the ideal performance as “involv[ing] the assumption of an entirely new psychological stance for each of the parts.” Finally, we close the night with the conceptual Georges Aperghis’s Les guetteurs de sons, performed by percussionists Mike Williams, Jeff Means, and Nick Tolle.

Join us for this rare program highlighting our soloists within the Consort — Thursday, October 4th in New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall at 8:00 PM; free admission. Not to be missed!

— your friendly webbottress.