The Callithumpian Blog

Archive for September, 2011|Monthly archive page

Cage, Bartok, & Reich in Idaho

In concerts on September 20, 2011 at 1:17 pm

Hello from Moscow, Idaho!  We’re performing tonight at 7:30 pm at the University of Idaho with a piano-and-percussion heavy program, kicking off the 2011-2012 Auditorium Chamber Music Series.  On the bill tonight: Cage’s Credo in Us, Bartok’s Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, and Reich’s Sextet.  Our touring ‘Thumpers this time around are our own Stephen Drury and Yukiko Takagi on piano, as well as our rockstar percussionists Scott Deal, Jeffrey Means, Bill Solomon, and Nick Tolle.

We’re in residence this week, giving demos, masterclasses, and concerts to the folks here in Moscow.  Feel free to come by if you’re in the area, and don’t be shy — we’ll be hanging around after the concert for a meet-and-greet.  More information on our residence can be found here and here.

See you tonight!

webbottress

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Kicking Off: Murail, Reich, Liang

In Uncategorized on September 9, 2011 at 11:15 am

(photo of Tristan Murail by E. Schneider)

Happy September!  We’re off to a hefty start this season, kicking off with Tristan Murail‘s Le Lac, Steve Reich‘s Sextet, and Lei Liang‘s Aural Hypothesis on Wednesday, September 14th in Jordan Hall.

This past summer, we were thrilled to have French composer Tristan Murail in residence here in Boston at our annual Sick Puppy (SICPP: Summer Institute of Contemporary Performance Practice) festival, where we performed a large array of his music, including the world premiere of Lachrymae (2011) as well as our first performance of Le Lac (2001).  Murail describes this work (scored for an ensemble of 19) as being inspired by the emergent and ephemeral layers he experienced at a lake to the north of New York City.  “Every day, every hour, the lake has a different light, a new mood. It is ever present but ever changing, reflecting and magnifying the incessant movement of the seasons and climates.” (tristanmurail.com)

Steve Reich‘s Sextet (1985) is written for percussion and keyboards: a shifting exploration of melody and harmony, at times revealing itself as foreground, then melting into the background (and back again).  Without a doubt, Sextet is a work of utmost focus, with its cyclic weaving of rhythm and patterns lasting just under half an hour.

Chinese-born American composer Lei Liang brings us Aural Hypothesis (2010), scored for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, piano and vibraphone.  In the approximately eleven minutes that elapse, quiet and intimate sounds suddenly rush into a saturated storm, making its exit with glissandi and staccati carving and punctuating an elusive sonic texture.  A beautiful work, not to be missed live.

These three works — Le Lac, Sextet, and Aural Hypothesis — are guaranteed to blow you away into new musical worlds.  What better way to start the season?  Come join us on Wednesday, September 14th at 8pm in Jordan Hall and share this experience with us.

— your friendly webbottress.